Soloists
Ricardo Morales is the principal clarinetist of The Philadelphia Orchestra. Prior to this, he was principal clarinet of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, a position he assumed at the age of 21 under the direction of James Levine. He began his professional career as principal clarinet of the Florida Symphony at age 18. In addition, he has performed as guest principal clarinet with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, The New York Philharmonic and at the invitation of Sir Simon Rattle, performed as guest principal clarinet with the Berlin Philharmonic. He has also participated as principal clarinet of the Saito Kinen Festival Orchestra in Matsumoto, Japan, under maestro Seiji Ozawa. He has been a featured soloist with many orchestras including the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Cincinnati Symphony, the Indianapolis Symphony, the Seoul Philharmonic, Les Violons du Roi, the Flemish Radio Symphony, the North Carolina Symphony, the Puerto Rico Symphony, the Florida Symphony and the Columbus Symphony. During his tenure with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, Mr. Morales soloed under the baton of James Levine in Carnegie Hall and on two European tours. He made his solo debut with The Philadelphia Orchestra in 2004 with Charles Dutoit and has since performed as soloist on numerous occasions.
  
An active chamber musician, Mr. Morales has performed in the MET Chamber Ensemble series at Carnegie's Weill Recital Hall with James Levine at the piano, at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, the Saratoga Chamber Music Festival, on NBC's The Today Show, and with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. He has performed with many distinguished ensembles such as The Juilliard Quartet, the Pacifica Quartet, the Miró Quartet, the Leipzig Quartet and The Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio. He has also collaborated with Christoph Eschenbach, André Watts, Emmanuel Ax, Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Gil Shaham and Kathleen Battle. Mr. Morales is highly sought after for his recitals and master classes, which have taken him throughout North America and Europe. In addition, he currently serves on the faculties of the Juilliard School, Temple University and the Curtis Institute of Music.
  
He has been a featured soloist with many orchestras including the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, the Cincinnati Symphony, the Indianapolis Symphony, the Seoul Philharmonic, Les Violons du Roi, the Flemish Radio Symphony, the North Carolina Symphony, the Puerto Rico Symphony, the Florida Symphony and the Columbus Symphony. During his tenure with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, Mr. Morales soloed under the baton of James Levine in Carnegie Hall and on two European tours. He made his solo debut with The Philadelphia Orchestra in 2004 with Charles Dutoit and has since performed as soloist on numerous occasions.
  
His performances have been met with critical acclaim. The Philadelphia Inquirer hailed his appointment to the Philadelphia Orchestra, stating "…in fact, may represent the most salutary personnel event of the orchestra's last decade." He was also praised by the New York Times as having "...fleet technique, utterly natural musical grace, and the lyricism and breath control of a fine opera singer." Mr. Morales was also singled out in the New York Times review of the Metropolitan Opera's production of Berlioz's Les Troyens, describing his playing as "exquisite" and declared that he "deserved a place onstage during curtain calls."
  
His debut solo recording, French Portraits, is available on the Boston Records label. Morales' recent recordings include performances with The Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio and also with the Pacifica Quartet, which was nominated for a Latin Grammy Award. Mr. Morales has joined forces with internationally recognized master acoustician and instrument maker Morrie Backun, of Backun Musical Services, to create MoBa, a line of artist clarinets and clarinet accessories including: mouthpieces, bells, and barrels. Mr. Morales has also been teaching clarinet online since 2012 as part of the ArtistWorks Classical Campus.


Carl Cranmer made his debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra at the age of nine. Since then, in addition to solo recitals in Europe, Asia, and North America, he has performed in concert with the Royal Philharmonic of England, the Gulbenkian Orquesta of Portugal, the Juilliard Orchestra and several other orchestras on the Eastern Seaboard. In addition to his study in conservatories of music in the United States, he also studied at the Sommerakademie at the Mozarteum, in Salzburg, Austria under full scholarship, where he was under the tutelage of distinguished teachers Karlheinz Kammerling, Jacob Lateiner, and Hans Graf.
  
Dr. Cranmer has been the recipient of many competition prizes and awards. He was the Grand Prize winner of the 1994 Missouri Southern Piano Competition. In 1995, he received the Spanish Music Prize, and the Finalist Prize in the Santander Paloma O'Shea International Piano Competition in Santander, Spain. He also won Fourth Prize in the 1999 World Piano Competition in Cincinnati, was a finalist in the 1996 Washington International Competition in Washington, D.C., and a semifinalist in the Montreal International Piano Competition in Washington, DC, the Marguerite Long International Piano Competition in Paris, France, the Naumburg International Piano Competition in New York City, and the Hamamatsu International Piano Competition in Japan. In 2000, he was selected to be on Philadelphia's Astral Artistic Services outreach roster of performers.
  
In summer, 2007, Dr. Cranmer recorded a compact disc of the Concerto for Piano by the late West Chester composer Samuel Barber with the Russian Philharmonia, led by maestro Ovidiu Marinescu, conductor and violoncellist from West Chester University, which was recorded in Moscow, Russia. Locally, other concerto appearances last season include Saint-Saëns's Concerto No. 2 in G minor with the Kennett Symphony Orchestra, and the Schumann Concerto in A minor with the Delaware Country Symphony.
  
Dr. Cranmer has considerable exposure in important national and international venues. He has performed in Avery Fisher Hall, Carnegie Weill Hall, Alice Tully Hall, and Merkin Hall in New York, in the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., and in the Academy of Music and the Perelman Theater in the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia. His performances have been televised in Madrid, Tokyo, Missouri and Philadelphia, and his performances have been aired on NPR, and radio stations in New York, Chicago, Montréal, Boston, and Atlanta. In addition to performances in Austria, France, England and Japan, he has had the opportunity to have two solo concert tours of Spain. In May 2002, he was invited to perform a solo recital sponsored by the American and Spanish Embassies in Panama City, Panama.
  
Dr. Cranmer also performs a wide variety of chamber music. He has performed in recital with German violinist and Naumburg Competition winner Axel Strauss in Boston, Pittsburgh, Atlanta, and Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Chicago and Seattle. In 2004, their performance in Steinway Hall in New York City was broadcast by NHK on public television stations in Taiwan, Korea and Japan. Dr. Cranmer has also collaborated with a variety of other musicians, including the Grammy-winning Takács Quartet, baritone Randall Scarlata, tenor Robert White, and violinist Akiko Suwanai. He has performed in the summers at Tanglewood, Pianofest in the Hamptons, and the Bowdoin Summer Music Festival.


Hailed in Strings Magazine for "style and elegance" and "lyrical expressiveness," Lawrence Stomberg enjoys a wide-ranging career as soloist, chamber musician and pedagogue. Since his debut at Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall in 1999, he has been a featured performer as faculty at the Eastern Music Festival and Texas Music Festival, and as a founding member of the ensembles Trilogy, the Johannes Trio, and Brightmusic. He currently serves as cellist of the acclaimed Serafin String Quartet, performing with them throughout the United States. Recent seasons have brought him, as soloist and collaborator, to venues throughout the United States and abroad, including concerto performances with orchestras in Delaware, Georgia, Alabama, and Bogotá, Colombia, as well as recital debuts in China and the United Kingdom. The 2014-15 season will bring recital performances in London, Vienna, and across the United States.
  
A committed interpreter of new music, he has championed new works by many American composers, both with commissions and first recordings. His debut recording, The American Cello, was released in 2000, and he was a featured performer in two critically acclaimed CDs released in 2013, with music by American composers Jennifer Higdon (on Naxos Records) and Kirk O’Riordan (on Ravello Records). He has also recorded for the VAI and Centaur labels. As an orchestral performer, he served as Assistant Principal Cellist in the Oklahoma City Philharmonic and as a member of the Tulsa Philharmonic and Eastern Philharmonic Orchestras. An active and dedicated pedagogue, Stomberg served on the faculties at Truman State University in Missouri and Oklahoma State University before joining the music faculty at the University of Delaware in 2004, where he is currently Associate Professor of Cello. He lives in Delaware with his wife, cellist Jennifer Crowell Stomberg, and their three children. Mr. Stomberg plays a School of Testore cello, circa 1727, obtained with the generous assistance of Dr. William Stegeman.